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> Exhausted - Don't Know What To Do Next, Alesis HD24XR, and MacPro Dual Quad
dad4mad
post Thu 22 Jan 2009, 01:37
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I've had so many recommendations that my head is going to explode, and yet I'm still asking for help - [size="4"][/size] begging for help.
I have an Alesis HD24XR and a brand new MacPro Dual Quad, 3TB/16GB RAM.
I used to have a Dell, and after fighting this thing (that's why they call 'em workstation) I finally gave up, took out my drives, threw it down the stairs, then went online and bought the Mac.
I don't want to invest in cheap bottom of the line stuff, but don't have a lot of cash after buying the Mac
I am in need of help finding the right interface (or sound card) and the right software for the Mac.
I've been told ProTools is good, but I want to move 24 tracks, so do I need to spend a ton of money
The M2...whatever only does two tracks.

Help i am lost!!
I'm an old school analog guy, wanting to get into the DAW age... rolleyes.gif
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deaconblue
post Thu 22 Jan 2009, 06:11
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hey dad4mad,

The MacPro has Optical digital audio input and output TOSLINK ports and it would appear that the Alesis HD24XR does as well. You could get by using Logic Studio or Logic Express or even Garage Band to get the audio mixed down to 8 tracks out via a bus if the Alesis supports it to the digital optical audio out and into a DAW of your choice with fairly good results and no more expense.

With the Alesis, I am not sure why you are wanting to do the computer DAW instead since the studio in a box design of the HD24XR should be a fairly straight forward transition from analog. However, I personally could never get my head around the SIB interface of the HD recorders.

So, if you are trying to get into the computer DAW world for the additional flexibility and control, I'd recommend a hardware interface that suits your specific application (not software, but the how, why and what you are recording).

The MOTU boxes are excellent. I use an original 828 FireWire interface with Digital Performer, Logic Studio, Logic Express, Garage Band, Audacity and Peak depending on the task at hand. For versatility and robust projects I rely on Logic Studio primarily. (project studio, multi channel 'recording projects'; album, EP, etc.)

I use an M-Audio MobilePre USB with Logic Express and Garage Band to do two channel mobile captures with a PowerBook. (interviews, podcasts, small club, coffee shop, etc. live captures)

I use an Alesis IO|26 and Logic Express/Garage Band to do multi channel captures with a PowerBook. (club, bar, middle size venues, podcasts, live captures).

You can spend as much or as little as you want to/need to and buy all kinds of hardware. However, I would say take the time to go to a music store in your area and ask to see some of the DAWs in action. Look for a good interface (these are just a couple of those available these days) and get a MIDI control surface to help you with the transition from an analog board to a DAW. Ideally, you are looking for something that is the most comfortable for you since you are already familiar with recording techniques and are only needing a new paradigm to explore. The more comfortable that transition is the less stress and frustration you will feel once you make it. And that means more creativity and less teeth grinding, hair pulling, WTF?!? of a new system that feels foreign.

My recommendation is Logic. But that is because it is what I am most familiar with besides Digital Performer, with my primary reason being that I am able to open up files from Logic Express and even GarageBand with a single click to open and convert them without loosing anything in the process. Pick the one that feels the best and meets your technical needs. You've already made the biggest shift. From a Windows based PC to a Mac. The rest is just getting it under you hands again.

I know that is a long answer to your question, especially given the first line of your post being "I've had so many recommendations...", and I hope I have not made it worse for you. I truly hope this helps in your quest.

peace.


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mortalengines
post Thu 22 Jan 2009, 06:21
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The Digi003 has plenty of input available....18 available tracks total. The rack version just became available. MOTU has some good multi channel interfaces as does RME (the Hammerfall). Any of the above would work just fine.

www.myspace.com/mortal_engines
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Decker
post Thu 22 Jan 2009, 06:27
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I would look into Logic Pro.
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ckb
post Thu 22 Jan 2009, 06:28
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I know plenty of people love PT, and lots love Sonar/Cakewalk, and others love other apps.

But I switched to Logic Pro in mid 2008 and have enjoyed -- that's right, enjoyed -- every minute I've spent with it. I made back the purchase price on the first theater gig I did after buying it, and of course that helped, but even without that... I have so much fun working with it.

But that's me. Everyone's different.

Maybe you could tell us all what kinds of music you make, and that might help people make more targeted recommendations.

Best of luck!
CK

p.s. I just saw this earlier post and second it, almost to the last detail: "The MOTU boxes are excellent. I use an original 828 FireWire interface with Digital Performer, Logic Studio, Logic Express, Garage Band, Audacity and Peak depending on the task at hand. For versatility and robust projects I rely on Logic Studio primarily. (project studio, multi channel 'recording projects'; album, EP, etc.)"

This post has been edited by ckb: Thu 22 Jan 2009, 06:30
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philflood
post Thu 22 Jan 2009, 18:14
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This looks like the hot ticket:

Alesis Fireport 1394 Firewire Interface ADAT/FST


There are also ADAT to Firewire interfaces available. You might consider one of those.


As for software, I use Logic. It was a fairly easy transition from Cakewalk. I had an early Mac ProTools system, and did not care for it, but it was probably since the computer just was not very capable. I just don't see that one get thie money's worth with ProTools systems, versus the price of Logic.
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dad4mad
post Thu 22 Jan 2009, 19:30
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To all,
Great responses, and i appreciate the info. Deacon had a lengthy reply was was very very helpful.
I record solo artist all the way to church choirs. Typically drums/bass/guitart scratch tracks then over dubbing for better individual track performance.
I spoke with Chris Kramer at Sweetwater, and got some great help.
I've heard the pros and cons of each software package mentioned, and decided last night to go the ProTools route, with the PT MBox2ProFactory with Pro Tools LE
my friend's studio in Nashville uses Pro Tools, and even though many of these other s/w packages clain to be able to integrate, I decided to go with what some say is the 'industry standard'
I've used Cakewalk in the past, and used to have a Roland 2480DVD DAW, automated, etc., but I think the HD24 with the HD24 Fireport (which I already have) will suffice to get the data to my Mac.
Then I'll just go through the gyrations of getting better with PT.

Appreciate all the responses, glad I joined.
Thanks again!
Rock on (if that's your genre...) biggrin.gif
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gdoubleyou
post Thu 22 Jan 2009, 23:39
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QUOTE (dad4mad @ Thu 22 Jan 2009, 10:30) *
To all,
Great responses, and i appreciate the info. Deacon had a lengthy reply was was very very helpful.
I record solo artist all the way to church choirs. Typically drums/bass/guitart scratch tracks then over dubbing for better individual track performance.
I spoke with Chris Kramer at Sweetwater, and got some great help.
I've heard the pros and cons of each software package mentioned, and decided last night to go the ProTools route, with the PT MBox2ProFactory with Pro Tools LE
my friend's studio in Nashville uses Pro Tools, and even though many of these other s/w packages clain to be able to integrate, I decided to go with what some say is the 'industry standard'
I've used Cakewalk in the past, and used to have a Roland 2480DVD DAW, automated, etc., but I think the HD24 with the HD24 Fireport (which I already have) will suffice to get the data to my Mac.
Then I'll just go through the gyrations of getting better with PT.

Appreciate all the responses, glad I joined.
Thanks again!
Rock on (if that's your genre...) biggrin.gif


Not quite correct PT|HD is the industry standard not to be confused with PTLE, Apogee symphony setups are starting to show in studios in my region as a cost effective, and superior sounding replacement for PT|HD .

cool.gif


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deaconblue
post Fri 23 Jan 2009, 06:00
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dad4mad,

welcome to the forums. You'll find the biggest and best resource here to be the incredible member base which you have joined and their willingness to jump in and help out.

Glad you are moving along the path. Don't let the 'stuff' get in the way of the Stuff. The music is the thing regardless of how you get it to disc. Good luck with the PT setup. And don't let the learning curve (there will be one no matter what package you decide on) get to you. This site is an excellent resource for the gotchas and there are plenty of tutorial sites available as well (MacProVideo springs to mind) to help get you started if you need more in depth ramp up assistance.

cheers!


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ckb
post Sat 24 Jan 2009, 22:40
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Here's a little more input, and I'm really sorry I forgot about this one the first time I responded: Electronic Musician recently did the article "Building a Personal Studio on Any Budget," and they break down 4 different types of studios (portable digital versus film composing vs. sound design vs.....) and build them out at low and high budgets. Really great roundup.

http://emusician.com/tutorials/emusic_build_personal_studio/
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