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> Pre-amo?, Pre-Amp
Nicola Bloom
post Wed 24 Jan 2007, 20:40
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Hello there.

Can someone suggest how I can get a less buzzy sound on my tracks.

Im using an electric acoustic guitar and microphone - and inputing them straight into a M-Audio FastTrack guitar/mic recording interface.

Guitar Amp & Bass (local music tech shop) suggested a Pre-Amp. Will this unit give the signal greater quality - less buzz?

If so, can you recommend cheap pre-amp budget £50

Thanks

Nicola (ibook G4 1.2 OX10.3.9)
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dixiechicken
post Thu 25 Jan 2007, 13:37
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Hi Nicola!

If you're using the built in mick on your accoustic guitar - and going straight in with
your guitar-cable ( the usual cabe you can use to guitar-amp ).

1) Try to check if your mick in the guitar is humcancelling/humbucker type.

2) If not - you must try to break up the hum genarating loop:
a) Try to connect all your electric-gear to the same electric outlet.
Avoid daisychaining powercords/outlets - the connection pattern should be
starshaped.

b) Try to move the guitar/mick and other gear around so as not getting too close to
to every equipment.

c) Try to check that signal-levels out and impedance levels from guitar/mick and the
M_Audio input matches.
( I wont explain exactly what that means right here - too long )

d) If your M-Audio interface, computers,etc is connected to power via grounding
plugs/outlets pull the plugs and rotate them 180 degrees push them back in.
( in Sweden we can do this - you may not - depending on the shape of the plugs )

e) You can try to pull the plugs and isolate the grounding pins with silver-tape or such.
Start with the audio inter face

If this doesnt help you may have to get an "active direct/line box" to achieve a simulated balanced electrical signal from your guitar/mick into the M-Audio interface.

Some line-boxes let you adjust the output/input levels.

Some are rather expensive some are very expensive.
You would need an active linebox whose electronics is, at the very least, on par --
or even better than the electronincs in the M-Audio interface.

Cheers: Dixiechicken


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loudnoiz
post Fri 26 Jan 2007, 01:08
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the problem is most likely within the electronics of the guitar. A new pre-amp is not going to solve your problem.
You could try recording the buzz from the guitar and then mixing it together with the recorded track with the silent/buzzy track 180 degrees out of phase. It is possible that it will get rid of the buzz or at least lessen it.
Plug-ins are also an option.
Or you could just record your guitar with the microphone without sending your guitar to a pre-amp.
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dixiechicken
post Fri 26 Jan 2007, 12:55
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QUOTE (Nicola Bloom @ Wed 24 Jan 2007, 21:40) *
Hello there.
..........
Can someone suggest how I can get a less buzzy sound on my tracks.
.....
... removed text
If so, can you recommend cheap pre-amp budget £50

Thanks

Nicola (ibook G4 1.2 OX10.3.9)


Hi Nicola!

Crashcourse on signal levels and electric impedance matching:

1) Impedance is frequency dependent resistance the the elctric current flowing through
a cable, loudspeakercoil, electronics etc.

OK:
A typical Vocal mic (Shure-58 lets say) vill procduce a couple of millivolts on the pins when you
shout at it. The impedance at the output pins will typically be around 150 - 200 Ohms.

The microphone output should then be connected to a amplifier/mixer/linebox etc. with an
input impedance of lets say 10KOhms - 50KOhms.
The amp-imput should accept about 5-10 millivolts as maximun value to produce the appropriate volume, effect-watts or volts at the amp output-pins.

Whats appropriate depends, a preamp may accept 5millivolts at the input and pruduce 775millivolts at the output.
A typical poweramplifier will need 775 millivolts at the input to procuce full effekt power (number of watts) to the connected loudspeakers.


Warning you CANNOT EVER reverse this signalchain.

IF your mic has an output-impedance of 50KOhms ( unusual - but anyway ) and you connect a
200 Ohms input - you will in practice almost short out the hot pin carrying the current - with
respect to the ground. ( your reference zero point ).

Result is heavy signal loss and a lot of extra hiss & hum.
It's possible to totally degrade the signal you actually want to record, into uselessness.

Cheers: Dixiechicken


--------------------
==================
Oh my god it's full of stars…
---------------------------------------------------
Mac-G5-2x.2.0, OS-X 10.5.1, 250/200Gb HD - 7.0Gb ram
DP-5.13, Motu 828 MK-II, MTP AV Usb, ltst drvs,
Kurzweil-2000, EPS-16, Proteus-2000, Yamaha 01V
Emes Kobalt monitors
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azkid
post Sat 27 Jan 2007, 23:21
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Hey there!

I'd been waiting to see what all everyone else would reply...? Please understand that the "buzz" you describe, may have MANY sources and/or solutions.. So allow me to explain some basics please.

That "buzz" may be distortion. Distortion is almost always caused by over amplifying.,, Too much input volume.

"Buzz" is a non specific term that's very dependant on the listener and equipment used to produce the input signal. It's usually used when the lower frequencies are too "over driven". Too loud. This may be do to your speakers, or your ears, or the recorded input signal being set too high.

Bottom line,... It would be better to record a clear signal (audio recording) at a lower input level or volume, and then add volume afterwards..

So lower your volume first, try to get rid of he "buzz".

If THIS doesn't help, then we can talk about matching impedances on microphones and/or guitar input jacks with your equipment.

Please define your "buzz" problem?

It may be interferance, i.e., with equipment, connections,... TRS vs TR cables...? Is this "buzz" a hum?

Like at 60 Hz? (Low frequency) Give us a little more info on this "buzz".

KEEP Trying!


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Nicola Bloom
post Wed 7 Mar 2007, 20:40
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QUOTE (azkid @ Sun 28 Jan 2007, 00:21) *
Hey there!

I'd been waiting to see what all everyone else would reply...? Please understand that the "buzz" you describe, may have MANY sources and/or solutions.. So allow me to explain some basics please.

That "buzz" may be distortion. Distortion is almost always caused by over amplifying.,, Too much input volume.

"Buzz" is a non specific term that's very dependant on the listener and equipment used to produce the input signal. It's usually used when the lower frequencies are too "over driven". Too loud. This may be do to your speakers, or your ears, or the recorded input signal being set too high.

Bottom line,... It would be better to record a clear signal (audio recording) at a lower input level or volume, and then add volume afterwards..

So lower your volume first, try to get rid of he "buzz".

If THIS doesn't help, then we can talk about matching impedances on microphones and/or guitar input jacks with your equipment.

Please define your "buzz" problem?

It may be interferance, i.e., with equipment, connections,... TRS vs TR cables...? Is this "buzz" a hum?

Like at 60 Hz? (Low frequency) Give us a little more info on this "buzz".

KEEP Trying!



a big THANK YOU to

dixiechicken, azkid, loudnoiz
who took the time to reply to my post.

THANKS !!!!! will be exploring all that was suggested.

nicola x
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lepetitmartien
post Thu 8 Mar 2007, 00:15
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QUOTE (azkid @ sam 27 jan 2007, 23:21) *
Like at 60 Hz? (Low frequency) Give us a little more info on this "buzz".
Note, the mains induced hum is 60 Hz or a multiple (120 Hz for example)

Of course in most of the world it's 50 Hz (or multiple), so it depends of your mains standard.


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